Salesforce.com is buying into the blockchain trend, announcing plans to release a CRM blockchain platform called Salesforce Blockchain to the general public in 2020.

Debuted at TrailheaDX – Salesforce’s annual developers conference – Salesforce Blockchain will allow companies to create blockchain networks, workflows, and apps. Much like its other offerings, it’s built for non-developers, so even marketers can get in on the action.

“We help companies build for the future by making breakthrough technology accessible and easy to use. Today we are doing just that with Salesforce Blockchain,” said Bret Taylor, president and chief product officer for Salesforce. “Now companies will be able to create new ecosystems and achieve new levels of interconnectivity through trusted partner networks.”

While it is not yet generally available, it has been released to a selection of designs partners including: Arizona State University, IQVIA, and Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC.

One of the benefits of blockchain technology is the ability to consolidate multiple networks, whether that is between multiple companies or departments. Chris Heusler, the global chief commercial officer for S&P, said that is a big advantage provided to them by Salesforce Blockchain.

“The KYC (know-your-customer) reviews and approval process is very time consuming and requires multiple parties to ensure each business is evaluated accurately and completely,” said Heusler in a press release. “Leveraging Salesforce Blockchain, S&P Global Ratings has created a trusted network of reviewers, where everyone can work from a shared, transparent and auditable review process; completely reinventing and expediting how we do KYC reviews for our customers.”

Additionally, blockchain can create a sense of trust and security when it comes to the authenticity of records; which is something that Arizona State University has been leveraging for the transfer of academic records.

“With Salesforce Blockchain, we expect that this educational trust network will allow us to better serve our diverse set of undergraduate and graduate student learners,” said Kent Hopkins, vice-president of enrollment services at Arizona State University. “This network has the potential to be a game changer for integrated, seamless learning—increasing transparency of student achievements and ultimately making the exchange process of academic records easier for both learners and institutions.”

 

 

 

 

 

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