Updated on June 26, 2014, at 2:38pm: We just had a great Twitter chat with outgoing Ontario Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian, John Lawford of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre, and Monica Goyal of Aluvion Law. Thanks to all who participated, and read on below for our recap of the chat!

 

Privacy, data, and the protection of personal information have been hot button issues for a while now. But lately, with the introduction of a new bill called the Digital Privacy Act, plus the appointment of a new federal privacy commissioner, there’s been a lot more buzz around privacy and what it has come to mean in Canada.

We’re holding a Twitter chat on Thursday, June 26 at 1 p.m. ET, running until 2 p.m.,  at the hashtag #ITBprivacy. We’ll be discussing the direction Canada is taking in its privacy legislation. If you’re on Twitter, we’d love it if you joined us!

We’re excited to announce we’ll be tweeting with a special guest expert – Ann Cavoukian, the information and privacy commissioner of Ontario. She is the creator of the mantra, “Privacy by Design,” which says that we can protect privacy by embedding it into the designs of our technologies, business practices, and physical infrastructures. The principle of Privacy by Design has gained recognition worldwide, and is now considered a global privacy standard.

Cavoukian will release her annual report on the state of privacy this month, making it her last report before she concludes her third and final term as Ontario’s privacy commissioner. She will be moving to a new role as the executive director of the Ryerson University Institute of Privacy and Big Data on July 1, 2014.

We’re also pleased to have two guest experts joining us for the chat:

 

  • Monica Goyal, founder and principal of Aluvion Law. Goyal has a background in both engineering and law, and her practice now focuses on both law and technology. She regularly blogs for ITBusiness.ca on privacy, legislation, social media, and ways tech companies can establish themselves as corporations. You can find her on Twitter at @monicangoyal.

 

 

Q1. What responsibilities do businesses have to protect customers and consumer privacy?

 

Q2. What measures can businesses take to protect customers and consumer privacy?

 

Q3. Right now, it’s not mandatory for businesses to report a data breach. How effective would this be to protect privacy?

 

Q4. How effective will CASL and anti-spam laws be to protect consumer privacy?

 

Q5. The Supreme Court has ruled ISPs can’t give customer data to the police without a warrant. What does this mean for privacy?

 

Q6. If passed, the Digital Privacy Act will allow companies to hand over customer data without consent or a court order. Thoughts?

 

Q7.The “Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act” has been critiqued as organizations could reveal consumer data without a warrant. Thoughts?

 

Q8. Daniel Therrien’s appointment as privacy commissioner has been controversial. Is someone embedded in government suitable as a watchdog?

 

Q9. In a time when it’s getting harder to protect our privacy, what tips can you share for safeguarding personal data?

 

Q10. What can Canadians do to demand more privacy protection from the public sector?


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