This technical article highlights the key information that you should know about Microsoft Small Business Server 2000 in order to successfully install, manage, and use it. This information was collected from technology consultants, customers, and Microsoft product support. Where appropriate, this white

paper directs you to additional sources of information.

This white paper was written approximately one year after Microsoft Small Business Server 2000 was released to customers. During this time, Microsoft collected the following types of feedback from technology consultants and users:

Information they wish they’d had before installing Small Business Server 2000.

Deployment and maintenance issues.

General product experience.

In addition, support calls received during this time were analyzed to determine the key issues that customers were experiencing.

This white paper is based on this feedback and provides information about the top 10 issues you are most likely to encounter. The topics are arranged in the order in which you will typically encounter them.

1. Understanding the license

Before installing Microsoft Small Business Server, you should be aware of the following licensing requirements and product limitations:

The Small Business Server computer must be the first domain controller installed on the local area network (LAN) because it must be installed as the root domain controller of the Microsoft Active Directory. If you have an existing Microsoft Windows 2000 Server domain controller, you can upgrade it to Small Business Server provided it meets this requirement.

Active Directory trust relationships are disabled.

You can have only one Small Business Server computer in the domain, but you can add member servers or replica domain controllers to the domain. For more information about adding servers to the domain, see the following section, “Adding Servers.”

All of the Small Business Server server applications must be installed on the Small Business Server computer.

Client access licenses (CALs) are enforced, and a maximum of 50 client computers can be connected to the Small Business Server 2000 network. For more information about client licensing, see “Client Access Licenses” later in this paper.

Should your business outgrow these limitations, Microsoft provides a growth path for Small Business Server.

Adding servers

The only limitation on adding servers to your Small Business Server 2000 network is that you cannot have more than one computer running Small Business Server. Adding servers dedicated to specific functions is a common practice. Some typical functions for additional servers are:

File and print sharing

Terminal Services for application sharing

Line-of-business applications

Replication (for example, Active Directory® and distributed file system)

For more information about adding servers to your network and configuring these server functions, see the white paper entitled “Adding a Server to Your Small Business Server 2000 Network.”

Using client access licenses

A client access license (CAL) is required for each client computer that accesses Small Business Server 2000. Although there is no limit to the number of user accounts that can be created, the maximum number of client computers that can be connected to the Small Business Server 2000 network is 50. For example, you can have 70 user accounts that share 40 client computers on the network. In this example, you would need 40 CALs.

Small Business Server 2000 includes 5 CALs. Additional CALs are available in Client Add Packs. These packs are available in increments of five or twenty and can be combined to allow you to connect a maximum of 50 client computers. Client Add Packs are unique to Small Business Server and cannot be used with any other Microsoft server applications–for example, Microsoft Exchange 2000 running on a server other than the Small Business Server computer.

Each CAL also authorizes you to access the services and functionality of any computers running Microsoft Windows 2000 Server in the same domain as the Small Business Server computer. You do not have to purchase additional CALs for these servers; however, you must ensure that each additional server is in Per Seat mode and that the number of client access licenses specified is equal to the total number of Small Business Server CALs. You can set the number of Windows Server 2000 licenses to the number of Small Business Server CALs. Select the per-seat licensing mode while installing the member server, and set the number of licenses to be equal to the number of Small Business Server CALs you purchased, plus the five that were included with Small Business Server.

2. Determining your deployment scenario

Planning is perhaps the most important factor in the successful deployment of your Small Business Server 2000 network. It is important to evaluate your current environment and determine the best way to deploy Small Business Server. For more information about deploying Small Business Server and for additional installation scenarios, see the white paper entitled “Small Business Server 2000 Deployment Scenarios.””

Determining server installation options

When planning to deploy Small Business Server, first determine what type of installation to perform. In the following list, select the statement that best suits your scenario, and then read the discussion that follows.

This is my first server.

I have a previous version of Small Business Server.

I already have a server and I want Small Business Server.

This Is My First Server

In this scenario, you are either upgrading from a peer-to-peer network or installing a network for the first time. In either case, you perform a new installation of Small Business Server.

I Have a Previous Version of Small Business Server

In this scenario, you have a previous version of Small Business Server installed and you want to upgrade to Small Business Server 2000. There are two ways to upgrade:

Upgrade the current Small Business Server computer.

Migrate the current installation to a new server.

Upgrade the Current Small Business Server Computer

Upgrading the current Small Business Server computer preserves all of your existing settings and data. Before upgrading, verify that you have a current full backup and that you have performed a test restore of that backup. You should also verify that all of your third-party applications are compatible with Windows 2000 Server.

Migrate the Current Installation to a New Server

To migrate the current installation to a new server, install Small Business Server 2000 on the new server computer and migrate your existing data and settings from the previous server. Migrating to a new server allows you to upgrade your computer hardware and to rebuild your existing configuration based on a new installation without losing your data or configuration information. For more information on migrating your installation, see the white paper entitled “Small Business Server 2000 Deployment Scenarios.”

I already have a server and I want Small Business Server

If you already have a server on your network, you can do one of the following:

Upgrade the existing server.

Perform a new installation of Small Business Server.

Upgrade the Existing Server

If your current server is running Windows 2000 Server, you can upgrade it to Small Business Server 2000. If the existing server is the first domain controller installed in the forest, using this option preserves all of your existing settings (including user accounts) and data.

If the existing server is a member server in a domain, you must remove it from the domain before upgrading to Small Business Server. During the upgrade, data stored on the server is preserved.

If the existing server is a member of a workgroup, your data will be preserved during the upgrade to Small Business Server.

Perform a New Installation of Small Business Server

If your current server is not Windows 2000 Server or a previous version of Small Business Server, you must perform a new installation of Small Business Server. You can install Small Business Server on your existing server if it meets the system requirements. Before performing the new installation, remember to save important data to a new location so you can restore it later.

You can also install Small Business Server on a new server. With this option, you start with a new installation and rebuild your existing configuration. After the installation, you can either migrate your existing data to the Small Business Server computer or leave the existing server on your network and continue to use it. For more information about using additional servers in a Small Business Server network, see the white paper entitled “Adding a Server to Your Small Business Server 2000 Network.”

Determing client computer options

To ensure successful installation and operation of the Small Business Server network, consider the following:

The existing network environment.

Client computer hardware.

Client computer operating systems.

Migration of data to the server.

The Existing Network Environment

If the client computers were previously connected to a network (such as Novell) or a workgroup, migrating these computers to the Small Business Server network may require that you manually configure networking and applications. For example, review the installed network protocols and remove any that will not be needed in the Small Business Server network.

Client Computer Hardware

To guarantee network performance and availability, you must verify that all hardware is compatible with the client operating system. This is particularly important for your network interface devices.

Client Computer Operating Systems

Because Windows 2000 Professional and Windows XP Professional were designed for the Windows 2000 Server networking environment, consider upgrading any existing client computers to either of these operating systems.

Installing Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP Professional on your client computers adds security, reliability, performance, and functionality to the Small Business Server network. Users will also find increased stability and improved usability. If you choose to upgrade your client computers, you can upgrade all of them at once or gradually phase in the new operating system over time. For information about upgrading client computers.

Migration of Data to the Server

You can migrate critical data to a secure network location. Centralizing your data storage on the network makes it easier to back up important data. Make sure to inventory your data and note any that you wish to transfer to the Small Business Server.

Validating your line of business applications

Another important consideration in the planning phase is to understand the requirements imposed by any line-of-business applications. Understanding the technical requirements of your applications will help you determine whether you can move the entire network to Small Business Server or if Small Business Server needs to coexist with other platforms.

3. Choosing your internal domain name

During the installation of Small Business Server, you must choose a name for your internal domain. It is strongly recommended that you choose an internal domain name of the form organization.local, where organization is the name of your company; for example, microsoft.local.

You may already have a registered Internet domain name–this name is different from the internal domain name. The internal domain name of organization.local should be used for Small Business Server installations even if the organization has registered an Internet domain name with an accredited Internet registration service. Using an internal domain name different from your registered Internet domain name creates a more secure configuration by isolating your internal domain from the Internet, and simplifies troubleshooting. Using an internal domain name that is different from your Internet domain name is the recommended configuration for Small Business Server 2000.

Look for four to seven in part two next week.

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