People are trying to find the best ways to combat Zoom fatigue, law enforcement in the UK is seeking to halt sales of a device that has been claimed to offer protection against the supposed dangers of 5G via use of quantum technology, and Trump is very mad with Facebook and Twitter.

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“Zoom fatigue” is sweeping the world, and Social scientists say that a number of factors are at play as the constant series of videoconference calls disrupt “normal, instinctual” forms of human communication. Among the sources of stress: constantly seeing an image of yourself, an inability to read body language, a lack of real-time feedback and seeing giant faces on the screen. There’s no silver bullet, but experts gave the Wall Street Journal a few tips: Try framing yourself better in the video, turning off your own feed so you’re not constantly staring at yourself, and emphasizing your movements more during conversations to help participants on the call better read your body language.

U.K’s Trading Standards officers are seeking to halt sales of a device that has been claimed to offer protection against the supposed dangers of 5G via use of quantum technology. The BBC spoke to cybersecurity experts who claim the roughly CA$675 device is nothing more than a basic USB drive with a fancy sticker slapped on. The 5GBioShield – that’s the name, crazy I know – was actually The 5GBioShield was recommended by a member of Glastonbury Town Council’s 5G Advisory Committee, which has called for an inquiry into 5G.

Trump signs controversial executive order that could allow federal officials to target Twitter, Facebook and Google from technology

And lastly, U.S. President Donald Trump is pretty upset with social media these days, which is why his latest executive order is targeting social media giants Facebook and Twitter. The order seeks to amend a federal law that, for the most part, spared tech companies from being sued or held liable for most posts, photos and videos shared by users on their sites. Tech giants have leaned on these protections, known as Section 230, and often describe them as integral layers of the internet. Trump repeatedly has argued they allow Facebook, Google and Twitter to censor conservatives with impunity—charges these companies deny. The move comes after Twitter fact-checked one of Trump’s recent tweets about main-in ballots

That’s all the tech news that’s trending right now. Hashtag Trending is a part of the ITWC Podcast network. Add us to your Alexa Flash Briefing or your Google Home daily briefing.

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