Learning from startup mistakes: Four lessons to live by

I began my career in technology journalism in Ottawa in the late 1990s, at the tail-end of the technology bubble. Covering the Ottawa start-up scene, one point I often heard still rings true: in the U.S., a failed started is looked on as a learning experience, but in Canada, a failure is viewed as a failure.

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It’s a striking cultural difference that still rings true today. And as important as access to capital is, or mentoring, or any of the other oft-cited inhibitors to start-up success in Canada, this needed cultural change is as important. We shouldn’t ostracize entrepreneurs with a startup failure under their belts; we should recognize their experience and that they won’t make the same mistakes again. And we should learn from their lessons.

In that spirit, over on the RIC Blog, Leah Jones, a student at the University of Toronto Mississauga and Sheridan College interning at the RIC Centre (Research, Innovation and Commercialization, a member of the Ontario Network of Excellence) has written a blog compiling four lessons that the leaders of failed startups have taken from their experiences.

Their lessons, in summary?

  • Don’t let ego get in the way
  • Choose your co-founders well
  • A business plan is essential
  • Culture beats speed

For more on each point, click the link below.

Source: 4 Lessons Learned From Failed Tech Startups

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Jim Love, Chief Content Officer, IT World Canada
Jeff Jedras
Jeff Jedras
Jeff Jedras is a technology journalist with IT World Canada and a member of the IT Business team. He began his career in technology journalism in the late 1990s, covering the Ottawa technology sector for Silicon Valley North and the Ottawa Business Journal. He later covered the technology scene in Vancouver before joining IT World Canada in Toronto in 2005, covering enterprise IT for ComputerWorld Canada and the channel for Computer Dealer News. His writing has also appeared in the Vancouver Sun & the Ottawa Citizen.

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