By Monica Goyal

Lawyers are increasingly relying on technology to help them get their work done and improve the level of service they offer to their clients. Failure to adapt to new technologies and processes could spell the difference between success and failure for some in the legal profession.

Lawyers seeking a better understanding of how technology is changing their profession can check out the latest additon to the Toronto “unconference” scene: lawTechCamp.  The morning of June 18th, 2011, legal and tech professionals are welcome to attend a first of its kind legal tech unconference.

Monica Goyal

“These are exciting times for a profession at a cross-road. The legal profession has only two choices: accept that the economic landscape has irreversibly shifted and adapt to new technology and processes, or keep its head fixed firmly in the sand where it will eventually die off as more nimble and efficient players enter the marketplace.  How legal services are delivered in 2020 will be vastly different from how they are delivered today. ”, says Mitch Kowalski, lawyer, writer and entrepreneur, co-organizer of the event.

lawTechcamp is a BarCamp-style community for new media and technology enthusiasts, technology lawyers, technology developers in the legal space, legal information professionals, bloggers, tweeters, social networkers, and everyone else who is curious about new media technology and its intersection with the legal profession.

“The purpose of lawTechcamp is to encourage conversation between the legal and technology communities in a casual neutral setting. As the sessions show, each field greatly affects and influences developments in the other, and there is much to learn from each other”, says Sapna Mahboobani, Toronto IT lawyer and a co-organizer of the event.

A full schedule is posted on the website, and can be found at http://www.lawtechcamp.com.

The discussion style sessions appear to be geared towards technology companies, lawyers, and those interested in technology developments in the legal field. The types of sessions range from developments in the practice of law that are influenced by new technologies to those that explain how the law is applied to technology issues.

There is no charge to attend lawTechcamp, but prior registration is required to assist in planning.

lawTechcamp is hosted by the Center of Innovation Law and Policy at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law Building (78 Queen’s Park Circle)  on Saturday, June 18, 2011 from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm.

Would you recommend this article?

Thanks for taking the time to let us know what you think of this article!
We'd love to hear your opinion about this or any other story you read in our publication. Click this link to send me a note →

Jim Love, Chief Content Officer, IT World Canada
Previous articleSomething good out of LulzSec attacks
Next articleHow Canadian tech start-ups can learn from Israel’s entrepreneurial spirit
Monica Goyal
Monica Goyal, Entrepreneur, Lawyer and Innovator is the founder of Aluvion, a legal solutions company offering technology, paralegal and lawyer-driven solutions with a special focus on the quality, cost, and accessibility of legal services for both businesses and individuals. Monica began her career working as an engineer in R&D for companies like Toshiba, Nortel and Nokia while earning her Masters of Engineering at Stanford. Monica's history conditioned her to solve problems in a efficient and tech-savvy manner, an approach she brings with her to legal solutions. Monica currently sits on the Canadian Bar Association's Futures Initiative, and will be teaching a course on Legal Technology at York University’s Osgoode Hall. She was recently named one of 10 Women to Watch in Tech in the Journal of the American Bar Association.