SEATTLE — The biggest news that came out of Teradata‘s annual partners user group conference was the release of Warehouse 8.0, its next generation of data warehousing tools that will allow companies to enhance so-called event-detection

capabilities.

In other words, they will be able to compare events happening in real-time to historical data already on file, enabling staff to take action for their customers, explained Alan Chow, senior vice president, Teradata development, at a news conference Monday.

To illustrate this, Dayton, Ohio-based Teradata provided an example of a customer transaction entered into a firm’s enterprise data warehouse. Teradata, a division of NCR Corp., identifies that the transaction is a returned order of a major product marked with a “”defective”” return code. An analysis looks into information about the customer’s past purchases, product preferences, inventory levels and other factors.

Based on this business intelligence, an alternative product is found that can be offered for a 20 per cent discount. The information is then communicated to a call centre, where an operator contacts the customer, apologizes for his negative experience and offers the sales item.

Another new feature of Warehouse 8.0 is the replication service, permitting customers to make changes in more than one system simultaneously, said Chow. He said that under an agreement officially made Monday between GoldenGate Software Inc., data can be synchronized between the Teradata Warehouse and others within a customer’s enterprise. Teradata said this approach is more cost-effective than allowing expensive systems to sit idle until needed.

Warehouse 8.0, which is in the midst of beta testing, will be commercially ready by December.

The Hudson’s Bay Co., which has been using Teradata’s version 7.0 for two years to manage its product assortment, sales and inventory — and is moving towards support of customer-centric retailing — is considering upgrading to 8.0, the key pieces of which are Teradata database V2R6.0, Teradata tools, Utilities 8.0 and NCR 5380 server.

Of particular interest to Mary-Jane Jarvis-Haig, senior manager of HBC’s data warehouse program, is 8.0’s management of mixed workloads, which is a “”combination of tactical and strategic decision-making,”” as well as the priority scheduler and query manager features.

HBC’s current system is “”doing what it needs to be for us in terms of . . . allowing us to a lot of complex workloads, meaning we have a lot of data,”” she said.

“”Retail has a lot of details. And so the ability to organize it using the features of the previous release — it just allows you to better manage all of that data,”” said Jarvis-Haig, adding users can ask more “”complicated questions.””

Version 7.0 has given HBC one enterprise-wide perspective for its multiple banners — The Bay, Zellers, Home Outfitters and its online store, said Jarvis-Haig.

Although there are always problems associated with installing new software products, she said, Teradata has always been responsive. “”We find the bugs; they help us fix them.””

Teradata also debuted at the conference a Retail Logical Data Model that can support radio frequency identification used to track retail items. HBC has not yet invested in RFID technology.

During the conference, Teradata also:

  • signed a deal with SeeCommerce to enable companies to identify and correct impending performance problems in their supply networks before they find themselves out of stock;
  • launched a collection of solutions for the gaming and resort industries;
  • improved functionality for its visual modeling tool, known as the Enterprise Data Warehouse Roadmap; and
  • introduced CRM version 5.1, which aims to improve the marketing process for organizations.

Teradata’s future plans, said senior VP Michael Koehler, are to invest in technologies that will integrate with partner solutions, and to form new relationships with application providers, tool provider and systems integrators.

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