Startup news round-up: May 30, 2012

With per-record data breach cost coming up to $204 and the average business disruption linked to non-compliance reaching as high as $3.3 million, focusing on compliance standards and preventative security measures has become imperative for businesses.

Data risk management

Claudiu Popa, principal of Toronto-based security firm Informatica Corp, will officially launch a book on Thursday that addresses the prime concerns of executives that value the protection of privacy. Popa is also a regular ITBusiness.ca blogger.

Managing Personal Information: Insights on Corporate Risk and Opportunity for Privacy-Savvy Leaders, is designed to boost data risk governance.

Along with a foreword by the Ontario Information and Privacy Commissioner, Ann Cavoukian, the book contains operational risk and data protection concepts ranging from vendor management, identity theft and incident management, a new enterprise risk assessment primer, methods of re-engineering privacy into organizations and templated resources for quick reference.

Surf safe and easy

A Toronto-based company aims to make public Web browsing more private. SurfEasy offers up a USB which comes in a credit-card-like holder.

Once plugged into your computer, it immediately launches a quick registration window that asks for you email address and password.

The SurfEasy browser is based on Mozilla. All of the browser’s traffic passes through a virtual private network connection to SurfEasy with the same level of security encryption banks use. The company says this means not even your Internet service provider, or Google or the government can snoop on what you are doing online. Google can only track your location by city, not by your individual IP address.

The company sells the stick with two gigabytes per month of encrypted use for $59.99/yr.A premium plan for $5/month gets offers an additional 25GB and a $10/month pan provides 75GB.

By Peter Nowak of Canadian Business

 

$100,000 up for grabs in BDC Young Entrepreneur Awards

Innovators aged 18 to 35 compete in the 24th edition of the BDC Young Entrepreneur Awards.

The grand prize for winner will receive $100,000. The second prize winner gets a $25,000 BDC Consulting customized internet strategy packaged designed to help the winner compete better and increase sales. and Mail.

There’s only two more weeks left in the competition and finalists are down to eight. For the first time in the award’s history, the public are invited to vote on who will be the winner via social media and mobile technology. To vote, visit the BDC website.

By Katherine Scarrow of the Globe and Mail

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