There’s a new voice in the crowd and it’s being heard over Internet protocol. Voice over IP is quickly gaining momentum as the standard of choice. Late last year, Telus was the first major carrier to actually bring a VoIP service to market, but it won’t be alone for long. Bell Canada is currently

in trials with the technology and last week Rogers Cable said it will bring a residential VoIP service to Toronto next year.The problem with this technology may not be finding a market for it (Cisco has already called Canada its largest per capita market for VoIP phones), but how it will be regulated. We spoke with the CRTC recently about what it plans to do with a technology that defies conventional boundaries. Also, TDM may be a little tougher than you think. Read all of ITBusiness.ca’s February coverage.

Industry on hold for CRTC VoIP decision
Feb 17: Canadian telecom providers are gearing up for massive voice over IP deployments, but a regulatory framework to govern the technology doesn’t exist yet. Bell outlines the pitfalls. Plus: What the FCC thinks

The tenacity of TDM
Feb 13: Everyone’s talking about voice over IP, but experts tell the Toronto Wireless User Group why they’re not quite willing to hang up on older, but still reliable, technology

Rogers takes ‘leap of faith’ on voice over IP
Feb 12: The company announces an offering through its high-speed cable service that even its president admits is risky. Bell and Primus assess the new competition

Do you know where your VoIP user is?
Feb 9: Flexibility and portability, the very things that make voice over Internet attractive to enterprise users, are hampering efforts to track emergency 911 calls. Telephony vendors are contemplating solutions, but the CRTC has yet to chime in

There’s a reason it’s called legacy
Feb 9: TDM is hanging tough despite VoIP’s best efforts to replace it

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