Re: Straighten up and type right (Oct. 14)

Nice comments. It certainly reflects the landscape of today’s office workers. I often do ergonomic assessments for people at their workstation

but also on the road. There are solutions for the mobile worker. Let me know if you want some suggestions.

Don Patten B.HK., CCPE
Ergonomics Consultant
Human Factors North Inc.

Re: Straighten up and type right (Oct. 14)

I read your column this morning, with interest, and I’m taking your suggestions to heart. Over the next months, CPA will produce an Information Sheet with tips for the communications/information age that we’re currently living in. We hope to include tips, proper postures, technique, stretches, etc. while working at a laptop on the road, talking on your cell phone and/or land line while you work at the computer or when you’re on the run, thumbing on your BlackBerry, etc.

Shari-Lynn Sare
Canadian Physiotherapy Association


Comment: More Canadians reeled in by phishing schemes (Oct. 7)

Many of us in the field might believe that people are being gullible when falling for phishing e-mails. However, we are being conditioned to trust e-mails by commercial entities such as Canadian Tire whose e-mails link to numeric addresses, and IT-related e-mails from ZDNet (Ziff Davis, publisher of various computer-related magazines) and ITBusiness.ca, both of which switch us to various sites underneath the covers.

The practice of tracking cookies from otherwise unidentified organizations also conditions us to tolerate exposures. Many companies apparently affiliate with Omniture, which sets cookies reporting back to 102.112.2o7.net or organization-name.112.2o7.net.

Even chartered accountants use the third-party site http://www.webtrendslive.com to track site usage. My belief is that we need to have more visibility and understandable linkages in both e-mail newsletters so the site clearly is linked to the sender, and ensure cookies and other accesses that we across when we visit a site are clearly related to that site.

Clark F. Morris, Jr.


Re: Outsourcing out of control (Oct. 6)

Two things come out of your article, which I have pointed out many times when discussing outsourcing. One, communication is poor or non-existent. Two, companies discover that having the people on site consistently makes for a better product and better productivity. Outsourcing is just a bad idea. Bring the ideas into the company along with the people who have them.

Upper management and the board of directors do not want to discuss anything unless it is either threatening the pile of money they have in their accounts or it is about to put an even bigger pile of money in their accounts. Thus, their meetings have only one track, and it is fueled by greed.

Michael MacDonald
Ottawa, Ontario


I was reflecting on the various newsletters and such I see on a regular basis and thought I would comment that yours is the only one that I am consistently pleased with. Your Canadian content and stories highlighting Canadian IT projects are great. Because IT in a university is both operational and research, I find you have a nice mix of information pertaining to both elements.

I hope you can pass on the compliment for a job well done to all your staff. I know people tend to hear only the negative comments versus the positive, and I thought I would pass along a positive.

I look forward to your publications. Have a super day.

Carolee Sewell Clyne
Library Systems Analyst
University of Northern British Columbia


Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name and company name along with an e-mail address or other contact information. All letters become the property of ITBusiness.ca. Editors reserve the right to edit submissions for length and content.

Share on LinkedIn Share with Google+