Re: Radwanski’s replacement: Who fits the bill? (June 24)

Regardless of governmental institutions and regulations, businesses must ensure their own information is protected in their

own best interests, including personal and private information on employees, suppliers and customers. This is one of the foundations of successful businesses. Regulators and regulations add a level of greater risk for such information to be disseminated inappropriately, to the liability of the company. Do not rely on government to do your jobs.

Ian Bush
president
Bush and Associates Consulting

Re: Radwanski’s replacement: Who fits the bill? (June 24)

Since you put together the Radwanski article, a caretaker has been appointed from within the Privacy Commission.

Both Stephanie Perrin and Valerie Steeves are potentially excellent candidates (I am particularly impressed with Prof. Steeves, having seen her present at several conferences sponsored by the Canadian Access and Privacy Association).

However, you overlooked one especially well qualified candidate, who, at this point in time, is potentially available within one week. Ann Cavoukian, Ontario’s Information and Privacy Commissioner, reaches the end of her five-year term on June 30th. To date, no announcement has been made by the Ontario Government that her tenure has been extended for another period. I asked Dr. Cavoukian at a privacy seminar two weeks ago (where she was pinch-hitting for George Radwanski) whether we could expect “”a good news announcement within the next three weeks,”” and her reply indicated to me that the formalities of her re-appointment had not yet been communicated to her! Let’s see if Ottawa can move more quickly than Queen’s Park.

Paul Darlaston

Re: Radwanski’s replacement: Who fits the bill? (June 24)

Sounds like a good fit for (ex-Information Technology Association of Canada president) Gaylen Duncan.

Bill Smith
IS manager
Unilock Ltd.


Re: Ontario schools receive $90 million for technology (June 19)

Being a retired technical teacher and seeing the decay in the present technical education, I appreciate what the government is doing to rebuild technical education. It’s too bad they destroyed it in the first place. I think more emphasis should be placed on building trades, i.e. electrical, plumbing, carpentry, where there is not a lot of high tech equipment needed. These are the basic trades that are and will continue to be required. From what I understand, the space for technical training has been absorbed by other subjects and is no longer present. What and how are the schools going to build for technical teaching with no available rooms?

Ronald Hotston


Re: Police forces team up to access mug shots online (June 17)

I read your article with interest. It seems to me that this was the intent of the Integrated Justice project and the Major Case project (resulting from the Bernardo inquiry). What has happened to that initiative and why are these police forces repeating ground that is already well trodden?

Paul Pierre
DISYS Consulting


Re: Easy for you to say (June 17)

Just an idea that came to me while reading ITBusiness.ca, and the editorial of today.

You certainly want to reach a large audience and people at decision levels. Many of those are not computer specialists. So why is it that nobody seems to realize that the dozens of acronyms and jargon expressions are incomprehensible to them?

Why not for example, and perhaps as an exercise in style, write a list of all the acronyms and jargon words contained in the article, with accompanying definitions?

Denis Bilodeau
president
Ubitext Inc.


Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name and company name along with an e-mail address or other contact information. All letters become the property of ITBusiness.ca. Editors reserve the right to edit submissions for length and content.

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