Re: The other downtime (July 22)

Your article on mapping the lessons learned in the tourism industry to the IT industry struck a particular chord with me. Your analogy is bang-on.

My

wife and I own and operate a small motel just west of Kingston, Ont., a relatively important end-destination tourist region. I also do IT consulting up in Ottawa, mostly during the winter. I have found over time that if I treat my IT clients with the same consideration as I do my motel guests, I never lack for clients or IT contracts. Call it CRM, or call it simply being responsive to your client; whatever it is and whatever industry you’re in, it works!

Thanks for good reading.

Avery Wagg


Re: Canadian patent holder claims global e-commerce rights (July 21)

Someone needs only to look at the “”e-commerce”” that the auto industry has been doing with EDI, private networks and telex dating back to the ’80s to realize that these business processes were not invented by this firm but rather they offered yet another way to enhance the existing experience. To say that they developed a process that was in its infancy is to confirm (right or wrong ) that they in fact were not the first to do it but the first to try to scam a patent over it!

John Preiditsch


Re: Business Objects acquisition has rivals mulling future (July 21)

I have a brother who works in Toronto and he sent me your article on Business Objects acquiring Crystal Decisions. The issue as we see it is that BI as an industry has followed a route to data warehousing and mining reporting — almost a separate “”ecosystem”” producing questionably useful information!

That is not how business works, unless of course you believe the main business driver is data not “”people and their processes.”” Hence the reason why BPM is a natural next step in delivery of solutions and the real time BI for both continual change and compliance monitoring.

David Chassels
CEO
www.procession.com

Re: Business Objects acquisition has rivals mulling future (July 21)

As a programmer this merger concerns me. We are currently using Visual Studio and Visual Studio .Net for a lot of application development. We have come to rely on having Crystal Report integrated into these Microsoft products. In fact the decision to purchase other reporting components usually comes down to cost. Crystal Report usually wins because it is a free add-in for Visual Studio.

Does this merger mean that there will be no more Crystal Report for Visual Studio? Will this force IT managers and developers to budget differently for the future? What about current support?

Cameron Dyck
Systems analyst/programmer
Western Region and Northern Territories
Statistics Canada


Re: An outside pitch (July 18)

I believe you explained an ideal communications balance between IT and sales people.

Ray Freeman
Vice-president
PresiNET Systems


Re: WiFi bundle aims to allay ISP concerns over DSL costs (July 17)

I am writing in response to an article that appeared on ITBusiness.ca where Howard Solomon claims the following:

“”However, it isn’t clear who will pay for the equipment and the connection to the Web. So far companies ranging from Bell Mobility to Vancouver’s FatPort are running free trials to gauge user interest and willingness to pay each time they connect.””

In fact, Fatport has been charging its users for access to its national hotspot network (currently the largest in Canada) for 15 months now. We know exactly who will pay for these connections, they are on our network!

We would appreciate it if these facts were checked before they are published to the world.

Michael Kuhlmann
Co-founder and vice-president business development
FatPort Corp.


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