Re: The writing’s on the wall chart (June 16)

Your article covers a lot of cheap-shot observations and some may be justified for practicing wannabes, but I think you are missing the

point though of this technique and the unique power of the group dynamics. When presented by practiced hands it really does work! and yes the charts and doodle notes do often get thrown out. It’s what walks out the door in one’s head that really counts.

Have you ever witnessed Dr. Edward deBono in action? (see “Lateral Thinking,” etc.) and this is exactly what he practices so superbly. My personal mentor was a grey-haired Sunday school teacher who told the most interesting and pointed Bible stories using only an easel and some irregularly-shaped coloured pieces of felt. How a mind can really soar!

G.L Strickler

Re: The writing’s on the wall chart (June 16)

I have to admit that I felt I have wasted precious minutes reading your critical article. Until you have a better suggestion other than saying that someone else should have a better idea, will you please hold your own criticism?

I read with interest, looking forward to some suggestion from you to replace the flip chart, until I reached the end. You’re being critical for the sake of being critical; you don’t have a better idea.

Next time, keep your criticism to yourself unless you can think of something better.

Eddie Chu

Re: The writing’s on the wall chart (June 16)

Take a look at www.resolver.ca or www.conceptsystems.com for what you are looking for. As a consultant I’ve long ago left flipcharts behind and use these decision support systems as the basis of real-time, digitized documentation. My clients also regularly follow my facilitation that uses Inspiration, Mind Manager and Visio for brainstorming. I trust, as a consultant to a columnist, you research these and use them. This will catch you up the late 1990’s.

Tony Gifford
Partner
Corporate Partners International


Re: The evil in e-mail (June 10)

I wish the professor well in his endeavor and I think the law enforcement people can use his stuff. However, when he’s finished I wish the good professor will turn his attention to spam, which poses a bigger problem for the average Joe. I spend 20 to 30 minutes daily getting rid of junk mail and am looking at changing my e-mail address again.

Bob Muma


Re: Ottawa ISP offers VoIP for Africans calling home (June 7)

This a good offering to our communities living in Canada. It would not only keep families in touch but be a source of a great development in terms of high-tech and cheap communication that would facilitate exchange and business between our communities: People to people, business to business.

Feysal Adan from Djibouti


Re: Macintel inside (June 6)

It is always interesting to read these inane type of remarks from people who pretend to knowledge but are broadly out of touch. You have no idea about what IT departments (in general) are saying about Apple’s servers, pricing and stability as compared to the operating system mess offered by Microsoft. How many did you actually check? Not only do you not know, based on what you print, you don’t know anything about Macintosh either . . . and obviously you don’t care.

There are many places where a Mac couldn’t work but there are also many places where PCs should have been replaced by Macs, reaping major support and cost savings. Unix has history, stability, security and more recently in the last few years has an understandable interface.

It doesn’t help anyone in the computing industry when the blind continue to lead the blind and many of the masses who don’t know any better, continue to jump off the cliff because of negative press like you propagate. Get your facts straight, buy a Mac server and then write about it (if you actually understand Unix) other than your introductory college course.

David G. Story
President
Big Apple Consulting Associates Inc.


I enjoy reading your editorials and hearing your perspective. Keep up the great writing.

Mark Vaughan
IT Manager
Hadrian Manufacturing Inc.


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