Albert Einstein once said, “”The world is a dangerous place — not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don’t do anything about it.””

Since Sept. 11, security systems, software and disaster recovery strategies have become of paramount importance to businesses of

all genres. Yet in this era of heightened security measures, Bob Scher, CEO of Clearwater, Fla.-based Dynasys Inc., says he can’t understand why his company’s checkpoint security training technology isn’t getting the attention it deserves from airport and government officials.

“”We’ve made a tremendous effort to contact the FAA (U.S. Federal Aviation Association), airport officials, private security companies, and they’ve all told us to talk to someone else,”” he says.

Standards are required for airport security guards, Scher argues. Better training for airport guards is essential. “”There’s been a real controversy over whether airports should be employing minimum-wage security guards, or hiring more senior employees. At the centre of the debate is the need for standards,”” says Scher.

The system gives employers the opportunity to train security candidates on how to properly use a metal detector, he says. The technology employs radio frequency identification (RFID) transponders and the Psion Teklogix Workabout mx handheld.

“”Emulating a metal detector using RFID is a natural thing to do . . . the system is fully programmable,”” he says.

In general, RFID systems consist of a number of components including tags, handheld or stationary readers; data input units and system software. The tags are the backbone of the technology, Scher explained, and they come in all shapes, sizes including smart cards.

“”It tells the candidate how many tags they caught and how many they missed,”” he says. “”This is also an instant way to determine who has the aptitude to do this type of job as well as rate the human fatigue factor of this job.”” Psion’s Nobert Dawilibi, vice-president of marketing and business development in Mississauga, Ont., says the two companies have been partners for about 12 years.

“”We’ve created a product that is rugged, reliable, and adaptable for people and enterprise users that work outside the corporate office space,”” Dawilibi says.

Scher added resellers should be paying attention to the RFIDs. “”Of my customer base, 50 per cent are resellers that use our data collection applications,”” he says. “”It’s an emerging market; resellers should get involved.””

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