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SAP delays price rises to appease users

SAP has delayed price rises on its controversial Enterprise Support following pressure from user groups. Price rises were due to come into effect at the beginning of 2010, but SAP has delayed any move while it “intensifies engagement with customers and user groups,” as it puts it. The company has been working with user groups to develop a set of benchmarks for its support services. User groups say the project is welcome, but its timetable was too ambitious.

IBM buys real-time database monitoring software company

IBM has acquired Guardium, a provider of software for real-time monitoring of database activity. Its software allows companies to detect fraud, outside attacks and other illegal activities. Its products will be rolled into IBM’s sprawling Information on Demand product portfolio. Although other companies offer database activity monitoring tools, Guardium is one of the few that can monitor mainframes, an important consideration for IBM’s customers.

Spam gang fined $15.2 million

A U.S. district court judge has ordered the largest “spam gang” in the world to pay nearly $15.2 million for sending unsolicited e-mail messages marketing male-enhancement pills, prescription drugs and weight-loss supplements, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission said Monday. Antispam organization Spamhaus, called the group the “No. 1 worst spam gang” on the Internet for much of 2007 and 2008. The network’s operation generated more than 3 million complaints to law enforcement authorities, the FTC said.

Nokia sues Samsung, LG, Philips, Toshiba for price-fixing

Nokia is suing display manufacturers Samsung, LG, Philips, Toshiba and others for price-fixing. It says it paid them too much for displays as a result of the price-fixing, and now wants some of its money back. It has filed lawsuits in the U.S. and the U.K., and is confident of winning its case as companies including LG, Sharp and Hitachi have already pleaded guilty to fixing the price of LCD displays and paid fines following an investigation by the U.S. Department of Justice. The European Union is also looking into display price-fixing.

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