Download our latest podcast here.

IBM to make mobile processors

A host of chip makers, including IBM, on Thursday announced a partnership to develop low-power chips for mobile devices, which could challenge Intel’s burgeoning presence in the space. IBM is allying with companies including Samsung and GlobalFoundries, which makes chips for Advanced Micro Devices, to develop smaller chips for devices like smartphones and mobile Internet devices. IBM wants to enable customers to design more power-efficient chips as the Internet and other applications become prevalent on mobile devices. The chips will be manufactured using the 28-nanometer process, an improvement from the 45-nanometer process widely used to make chips. The 28-nm process will enable chips to deliver a 40 percent performance improvement and 20 percent reduction in power consumption.

Sun leaves opening for IBM purchase

Sun Microsystems would be willing to revive acquisition talks with IBM if the latter company “makes a stronger commitment to complete the purchase,” according to a Bloomberg News report Thursday. Sun declined comment Thursday on the report, which cited two unnamed sources familiar with the matter. IBM did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Meanwhile, a separate report from CNBC, also citing anonymous sources, said Sun approached IBM a couple of days ago about reopening talks.  But IBM has cooled considerably on the prospect of acquiring Sun, due to the potential for a long and intense review by government regulators concerned about antitrust issues, the report added.

Google profits despite recession

Google grew its profit and revenue in the first quarter, ended March 31, despite a tough economic environment that is affecting online advertising spending, the company’s main revenue engine. Google reported revenue of US$5.51 billion in 2009’s first quarter, up 6 percent compared to the $5.2 billion in revenue it generated in the first quarter of 2008, the company said Thursday. Subtracting commissions and fees Google pays to advertising and distribution partners, revenue came in at $4.07 billion, slightly missing the consensus forecast of $4.08 billion from analysts polled by Thomson Reuters.

China netbooks will support 3G standard

Dell and Hewlett-Packard announced netbooks that support China’s 3G standard Thursday as China Mobile, which is promoting the next-generation mobile technology, seeks new ways to attract scarce users. The netbooks, Dell’s Inspiron Mini 10 and HP’s Mini 1000, launched in China with built-in data cards for the 3G standard used by China Mobile, TD-SCDMA. Chinese PC makers including Lenovo also launched 3G netbooks this week. Lenovo launched three models that can climb online through either TD-SCDMA or one of the 3G standards offered by China Mobile’s rivals. China Mobile will subsidize the netbooks by matching purchases with as much as 1,400 yuan, or US$205, worth of free Internet use, local media said.

…And those are the top stories from the IDG Global IT News Update, brought to you by the IDG News Service. I’m Sumner Lemon in Singapore. Join us again later for more news from the world of technology.

Share on LinkedIn Share with Google+