Ahead of our Nov. 29 Toronto event that will explore crowdfunding as an innovative way to make Toronto the best place to retain and attract new companies, we’ve examined several Canadian crowdfunding experiences. These startups show us how equity-based crowdfunding can be an effective way to raise money, and what more needs to be done for more businesses to access it.

How Canadian startups have made crowdfunding work

The face of startup fundraising is changing. Not so long about, it used to be that startup companies had to win venture capital before testing the market, raising money based on the proposition their product or service could succeed in an untested market. Or long-term loans were won from banks were awarded based on business plans, and backed by some signifcant collateral. But now crowdfunding is emerging as yet another avenue. While the ability to raise money from non-registered investors is gaining steam in the U.S. on sites like Kickstarter, and even equity-based investing will be legalized there next year, Canada’s options remain limited.

That hasn’t stopped several Canadian startups from exploring crowdfunding to get their business idea off the ground. We looked at some of the more interesting examples and asked them about their crowdfunding expeirneces with the existing platforms, and what opinion they held of equity-based crowdfunding. Here’s our series of stories looking at their responses:

Day Job ‘Day Job’ doc maker finds crowdfunding options lacklustre

Feature Story: David Chan is following tech firms based with Extreme Startups to make a documentary film. But he’s facing some startup challenges of his own, namely with fundraising.

Brain-sensing headband rides crowdfunding wave to success

Toronto’s Interaxon wants to bring thought-controlled computing to the consumer market. They’re using crowdfunding to make it so.

Voice-activated computer Ubi calls on crowdfunding 

In the lead up to our Technicity event about crowdfunding, we are looking at the experiences Canadian businesses have had with the crowdfunding platforms currently available. In this Q&A, we hear from Leor Grebler, CEO and co-founder of Ubi.

division furtive ‘Secret agent’ wrist watch says the time is now for crowdfunding 

In the lead up to our Technicity event about crowdfunding, we are looking at the experiences Canadian businesses have had with the crowdfunding platforms currently available. In this Q&A, we hear from Gabriel Menard, founder of Division Furtive.

Stact Stact’s elegant wine rack a crowdfunding success

In the lead up to our Technicity event about crowdfunding, we are looking at the experiences Canadian businesses have had with the crowdfunding platforms currently available. In this Q&A, we hear from Vancouver’s Jamie Kasza. 

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