Netflix lights up the Twitterverse after announcing it will invest half a billion dollars into Canadian content, Equifax is still in the news, and Mark Zuckerberg admits Facebook played a role in the results of last year’s U.S. election.

On Twitter, federal heritage Minister Melanie Joly says the government has struck a deal with Netflix, which has promised to establish a permanent film and television production presence in Canada and invest at least $500 million Canadian over the next five years into original Canadian productions that it will distribute worldwide. It should be noted that Netflix has been supporting Canadian content for years, spending millions to revive Showcase’s Trailer Park Boys, co-producing the recent CBC series Anne and Alias Grace, and distributing Space’s sci-fi hit Orphan Black in several markets as a Netflix Original.

Over on Reddit, Equifax is the target of its most high-profile legal battle yet. San Francisco is suing Equifax for, quote, “failing to protect the personal data of more than 15 million Californians,” endquote. This makes San Francisco the first city in the U.S. to sue Equifax over its massive data breach, which was revealed on Sept. 7 and compromised the personal information of 143 million U.S. consumers. The company is also the subject of a class-action lawsuit by Canada’s Merchant Law Group and a subpoena in New York.

Finally, on – where else? – Facebook, founder Mark Zuckerberg admits that he was wrong to dismiss the idea that “fake news” on Facebook influenced last November’s U.S. election.

Responding to a tweet from Donald Trump claiming Facebook has always been against him, Zuckerberg said, quote, “Calling that crazy was dismissive and I regret it. This is too important an issue to be dismissive. But the data we have has always shown that our broader impact — from giving people a voice to enabling candidates to communicate directly to helping millions of people vote — played a far bigger role in this election.”

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