Be careful with your bring your own device policy and how employees are accessing Microsoft resources at the office.

Employee iPads could cause more Microsoft-related costs: analysts

If your business allows employees to bring their own iPads or other tablets to work, then it’s possible you owe Microsoft more money for all your licence agreements.

What seems counter-intuitive is still the case, according to analyst firm Directions on Microsoft, which specializes in Microsoft’s licencing structure for medium-sized businesses and enterprises. The costs could arise specifically from users accessing Microsoft software via office Windows Server or remote desktop connections to Windows-based PCs.

Accessing Microsoft apps on tablets can increase your costs.

Microsoft’s Enterprise Agreements include a qualified device count and even employee tablets accessing Microsoft software can boost that beyond your service level agreements. When Directions on Microsoft surveyed 800 of its customers, it found 67 percent allow a bring your own device (BYOD) environment at the office. Of the companies that do allow this, one-quarter give direct access to Microsoft servers, 16 per cent allow a remote desktop connection, and 10 per cent support a virtual desktop infrastructure. Those are all cases where the device count would get bumped up.

But those costs could be defrayed depending on how you set up those iPads to access network resources, says Directions on Microsoft analyst Rob Horwiz. He explains how to do it the cost-savings way in a free Webinar that requires registration.

Source | Directions on Microsoft

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