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Cisco and EMC partner for cloud computing

Cisco and EMC this week unveiled their anticipated collaboration, which will provide integrated products and services for customers building private cloud computing infrastructures. The partnership, which also includes virtualization software vendor VMware, is set up in two parts: one is a Virtual Computing Environment coalition to develop the new products; the other is a joint venture, called Acadia, to train customers and partners on how to install and use the products. Cisco and EMC are lead investors in Acadia, while VMware and Intel are minority investors. Acadia will have its own CEO, which the companies are searching for, and an initial staff of 130.

IBM parts with accused inside trader

The IBM executive charged with insider trading by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is out of a job at Big Blue. Robert Moffat, the head of IBM’s Systems and Technology Group, was charged with conspiracy to commit securities fraud in mid-October and subsequently placed on a temporary leave of absence. IBM this week confirmed that Moffat’s leave of absence has become a permanent one, although the company did not say if he was fired or resigned. When Moffat was placed on a leave of absence, IBM named executive Rod Adkins the acting head of the Systems and Technology Group. He has now been appointed senior vice president of the division, the same title previously held by Moffat.

New netbook chips faster, use less power

Via launched its fastest netbook processors to date as part of a new lineup of chips that also draw less power, the company said on Tuesday. The company’s new Nano 3000 series processors are 20 percent faster than their predecessors, and use up to 20 percent less power, the company said. The chips run at speeds between 1.0GHz and 2.0GHz, and support the Windows 7 and Linux operating systems. The new processors should bring better application and multimedia performance to netbooks and thin and light laptops.

Businesses lose $100 million to cyber-thieves

Cyberthieves are hacking into small- and medium-sized organizations every week and stealing millions of dollars in an ongoing scam that has moved about US$100 million out of U.S. bank accounts, the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation warned Tuesday. It’s now one of the top problems being addressed by the National Cyber Forensics and Training Alliance, which works with the FBI and industry to share information about cyber attacks. There has been a “significant increase” in what’s known as automated clearinghouse fraud over the past few months, much of it targeting small businesses, municipal governments and schools, the FBI said.

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